History

The impact of the First World War in Hull

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Miss Brankley’s year 8 history group are being taught by the History Troupe, they are learning about WW1 as a whole, but in particular the impact of the First World War in Hull. The group have all been given a copy of Robert Bell’s book, Sharpe Street, which tells the story of 140 men from Newland Avenue, who fought in the war.  We have a couple sessions left, so there will be more photos and information to follow.

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Holocaust Memorial Day 2018

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On the run up to Holocaust Memorial Day 2018, we invited Mr Kapel in to the Academy to speak with our Year 9 GCSE History pupils. Mr Kapel is a Holocaust survivor. He was 8 years old when he and his family were awoken one morning by the Nazi’s. Mr Kapel was one of the lucky ones who made it to Poland, from there he was fortunate enough to make it across to Britain on the Kindertransport. He spoke of the first time meeting his foster family and his experience during the Blitz – for such a young boy at the time, this must have been terrifying.

A memorable talk for all of our pupils involved.

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Lest We Forget Competition

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Excellent entries for the Lest We Forget competition. 

Courtney created a poem about life in 1914 for a soldier and illustrated it with a Poppy, emphasising the importance of remembrance. Kahlen created a phenomenal picture of one aspect of remembrance, with a lone solider - we can only presume that his comrades have fallen. 

House points awarded to both girls. Well done.

WW1 Battlefields Trip

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Miss Brankley and two Year 10 girls attended the First World War Battlefield Tour.


Over 3 days we had a tailored itinerary and various questions to focus on during each day. We were accompanied by three serving soldiers so we could make the comparisons on how War was fought back then, to how we fight today. One example was the Corporal sharing with us how he felt when he served in Afghanistan, and we could relate this to how the soldiers of the First World War were feeling as they were about to go over the top. 



When visiting many of the memorial sites, cemeteries and battlefields it brought it home to us the scale of the World War and the impact that it had. Thiepval Memorial has 72,195 names of missing British and South African soldiers who died on the Somme Battlefield between 1915 and 1918. This would have left a huge hole in their communities back home.


103 years on from the First World War starting and 99 years from it ending, it is still hugely important that we still remember the fallen and those who are still serving in the forces today. 


Lest we forget. 

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Competition Winners

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The girls successfully entered the competition to win a trip to the First World War Battlefields, they created a very detailed presentation on ‘Why the First World War is known as the Great War?’. We will be visiting the worldwide known battlefield of the Somme on our 4 day trip. The Somme saw the British and allied forces lose many men and has gained the name as the Bloodiest Battle in history. We will also be attending a Last Post Ceremony at Menin Gate, this will be hugely significant as we will be over in Belgium on Remembrance weekend. 

Holocaust survivor, Mr Martin Kapel

Winifred Holtby Academy today welcomed Holocaust survivor, Mr Martin Kapel, who gave a talk to our year 10 history pupils regarding his life and particular his escape from the Nazi’s during World War Two.

During two talks Mr Kapel described his early years growing up in Germany, his forced expatriation to Poland, then his transfer to Britain via the Kindertranport, and finally his recollections of the Blitz in Coventry.

The background to this incredible journey was the rise of Hitler and the spread of fascism in Europe. Although Mr Kapel count’s himself extremely lucky to have escaped Poland shortly before the outbreak of World War Two, he still lost 22 members of his family, and remained with his foster family in Britain once the war was over. Throughout the talk the one overriding message was one of learning from the past, in the hope that similar events will never happen again.